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Taloi Havini: Reclaiming Space and History Latest Ocula Conversation
In Partnership with Artspace Sydney
Taloi Havini: Reclaiming Space and History By Ruth McDougall, Sydney

Artist Taloi Havini and Ruth McDougall, curator of Pacific art at Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art, discuss Havini's first Australian solo exhibition, Reclamation .

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Armory Week Lowdown: Art Shows to See Latest Ocula Report Armory Week Lowdown: Art Shows to See By Casey Carsel, New York

After structural issues forced The Armory Show into last-minute relocation pirouettes last year, the fair returns between 5 and 8 March 2020 with a flourishing programme, complemented by stand-out shows across New York City.

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Ella Kruglyanskaya Steals from Art History, Takes Back Gaze Ocula Insight Ella Kruglyanskaya Steals from Art History, Takes Back Gaze By Tessa Moldan, London

For her second solo exhibition at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, Ella Kruglyanskaya's compositions signal the many possibilities of paint.

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HomePage Artists

b. 1934, USA

Peter Saul Biography

Characterised by a corrosive sense of humour and distinctive cartoon style, Peter Saul's drawings and paintings often pair vibrant colours and grossly violent graphic imagery to examine the dark realities of contemporary American culture.

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Upon graduating from the Washington University School of Fine Arts in 1956, Saul travelled around Europe before settling in Paris. There, he began developing the satirical sensibility that can be seen in the exaggerated lips of Woman in Green Shirt and the dark, beady eyes in Portrait of a Man—two chalk drawings from around 1957. Saul also experimented with blending figuration and Abstract Expressionism, employing dynamic compositions with garish saturated hues and sweeping gestural lines. In Untitled (Lucky Strike) (1960)—crayon, watercolour and collage on paper—a jumbled array of angular abstract forms and recognisable objects such as a telephone, submarine, and speech bubbles are densely packed together.

In the early 1960s, Peter Saul began to incorporate images of commercial products. Pop culture icons are captured in violent and grim scenarios, such as Mickey Mouse surrounded by Japanese war planes in Mickey Mouse vs. the Japs (1962), or Superman sitting in a cell in Superman and Superdog in Jail (1963). The refrigerator is another recurring motif—a sign of luxury and wealth that Saul often has open, revealing unorthodox items inside. In the yellow and green Ice Box 8 (1963), we see a book and a gun with a human figure that has a red bottle as its upper body.

In late 1964, Peter Saul returned to his home city of San Francisco, where he became affiliated with the local Funk art movement. Funk art was made by a loosely associated group of rebellious artists—among them Bruce Conner—whose diverse practices rejected the allure of consumerism and mainstream culture. In 1967, Saul was included in the now-legendary exhibition Funk, curated by Peter Selz at the Powerhouse Gallery of the University Art Museum of the University of California, Berkeley.

In addition to popular culture and figurative abstract expressionism, Peter Saul has built his language from other sources including Surrealism. From the mid-1960s onwards, he has made representations of socio-political moments in contemporary America. Visually convoluted and distorted scenes of state-sanctioned torture and warfare are central to paintings such as Yankee Garbage (1966) and Saigon (1967), while Bush at Abu Ghraib (2006) references American officers' torture and abuse of Abu Ghraib prison detainees. Saul also addressed the civil rights movement of the 1960s (possibly with irony) in The Government of California (1969), in which Ronald Reagan—then the governor of the state—appears as a devil next to Martin Luther King, Jr, depicted with a halo. Other works, such as Subway 1 (1979), with its scene of brutal police violence, still resonate today.

In the 1970s, Saul began deriving inspiration from 19th- and 20th-century masterpieces—an approach he has stuck with. In his Last Moments on the Raft of Medusa (2015), he transformed the dark Romantic painting by Théodore Géricault into a brightly coloured mixture of horror and absurdity.

Saul's selected solo exhibitions include Art History is Wrong, Almine Rech, Paris (2020); Crime and Punishment, New Museum, New York (2020); and Pop, Funk, Bad Painting and More, les Abattoirs, Toulouse (2019). Saul taught at The University of Texas at Austin between 1981 and 2000, influencing younger generations of painters. In 2010, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Biography by Sherry Paik | Peter Saul | Ocula | 2020

Peter Saul Featured Artworks

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Didn’t Hurt by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulDidn’t Hurt, 1998Acrylic, oil on canvas
118 x 89 cm
Gary Tatintsian Gallery Enquire about this work
Daisy Crockett by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulDaisy Crockett, 1985–2015Acrylic on cardboard paper
79 x 69 cm
Gary Tatintsian Gallery Enquire about this work
This Is Not the Sandwich I Ordered by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulThis Is Not the Sandwich I Ordered, 2019Acrylic on canvas
152.5 x 183 cm
Almine Rech Enquire about this work
Attack on Abstraction by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulAttack on Abstraction, 2019Acrylic on canvas
152.5 x 183 cm
Almine Rech Enquire about this work
Lip Wrestling by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulLip Wrestling, 2019Acrylic on canvas
152.5 x 183 cm
Almine Rech Enquire about this work
Modern Thinker by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulModern Thinker, 2019Oil, acrylic and oil pastel on aluminium
101.5 x 178 cm
Almine Rech Enquire about this work
Untitled by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulUntitled, 2019Acrylic on canvas
152.5 x 122 cm
Almine Rech Enquire about this work
Woman Drinking Martini by Peter Saul contemporary artwork
Peter SaulWoman Drinking Martini, 2009Acrylic on canvas
119 x 90 cm
Gary Tatintsian Gallery Enquire about this work

Peter Saul Recent Exhibitions

Contemporary art exhibition, Peter Saul, Art History is Wrong at Almine Rech, Paris
Closed
18 January–29 February 2020 Peter Saul Art History is Wrong Almine Rech, Paris
Contemporary art exhibition, Group Exhibition, Naturally Naked at Gary Tatintsian Gallery, Moscow
Closed
15 August–28 December 2019 Group Exhibition Naturally Naked Gary Tatintsian Gallery, Moscow
Contemporary art exhibition, Peter Saul, You Better Call Saul at Gary Tatintsian Gallery, Moscow
Closed
22 April–27 September 2016 Peter Saul You Better Call Saul Gary Tatintsian Gallery, Moscow

Peter Saul Represented By

Peter Saul In Ocula Magazine

New Museum Announces Wong Ping’s First US Survey Ocula News New Museum Announces Wong Ping’s First US Survey New York, 13 March 2020

The rising Hong Kong artist is known for bright animations with dark themes.

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Peter Saul In Related Press

Connecting the Dots in the Met Breuer’s Show About Conspiracy Theories Related Press Connecting the Dots in the Met Breuer’s Show About Conspiracy Theories 15 October 2018, Hyperallergic

It will likely take me months to digest all the lessons I've learned from The Met Breuer's newest exhibition, Everything Is Connected: Art and Conspiracy , so it's a good thing that the show stays open through January.

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Everything is connected: new exhibition on art and conspiracy Related Press Everything is connected: new exhibition on art and conspiracy 17 September 2018, The Guardian

In 1974, Black Panthers artist Emory Douglas created a portrait of Gerald Ford, America's 38th president, being pulled by puppet strings held by giant corporations. A speech bubble had Ford saying: 'I Gerald Ford am the 38th puppet of the United States.'

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Peter Saul: the chocolate-smeared prankster of pop painting Related Press Peter Saul: the chocolate-smeared prankster of pop painting 3 October 2016, The Guardian

You certainly can’t mistake Peter Saul for any other artist. Splurges of lime green or spaghetti sauce red, gross caricatures of politicians, flamboyant sexual fantasies … His art is the American dream pumped up and injected with steroids, served with a hot dog and a tube of mustard coloured acrylic.

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